Tag Archives: Old Beach

How many square miles?

I do not know the area of land over which I have and will walk along the Derwent River.  And I do not care to find a definitive answer. That’s the sort of fact which doesn’t interest me.

However, I am fascinated to learn that there are 196,939,900 square miles of Earth to explore. So I made a slippery calculation – and determined there is less than 30 square miles per person on our planet.  Take out the area of deserts, and the too high mountains, and the number drops lower. The world’s population is growing rapidly so I strongly recommend you get out and walk your local beaches, parks, bushland, or sail the rivers and seas.  Enjoy these outdoor spaces while you can.

Almost two years ago I visited Hong Kong and walked the city streets with millions of locals in what was claimed to be the most densely populated suburb on earth. But even Hong Kong has thousands of acres of amazing parks, beaches and nature reserves all of which have walking trails in or around them.  All you have to do is to find your special natural places whether they are located in rural or urban areas.

Another revision: naturally therapeutic images from stages 7-10

I can’t help myself. Having reviewed my favourite images from the first half a dozen stages of my walk along the Derwent River, I felt compelled to continue looking through my collection from the subsequent walks.  I have chosen photos showing aspects of both the natural and man-made world and I believe all will prompt thinking about the Derwent River, Hobart and its suburbs, and the natural environment. My selection of the images with the most memorable impact for me, from stages 7-10, are given below.

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From the eastern shore looking northwards towards the Bowen Bridge, with a couple of black swans on the river.

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Two plaques ‘opened’ by two great Australian prime ministers near the Bowen Bridge.

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The rusting raw-edged remains of a ship, the Otago, at Otago Bay.

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My enjoyment of any family’s black sheep.

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Heading into Old Beach and gradually leaving Mount Wellington behind.

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The gloominess of the approaching storm when I reached Old Beach.

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The pleasures of well-made pathways, thanks to local government.

Green Point from new Old Beach

Looking northward across the Jordon River to Greens Point.

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The glories of native flora. In these instances, it was blooming wattle and a spectacular stand of eucalyptus/gum trees which attracted my attention.

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The remains and the signs of a burnt out car on a back track.

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Knowing that it is still possible to have a laugh when walking.

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Arriving at the Bridgewater Bridge.

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Walking on the western shore of the Derwent River for the first time during this project.

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The house of one of first European settlers, James Austin, at Austins Ferry.

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At Dogshear Point, walking around the Claremont golf course, with the thwacking sound of hit balls crossing the greens.

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Reaching Cadbury’s chocolate manufacturing factory in Claremont.

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The hand-hewn rustic style seat near Connewarre Bay.

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Passing MONA somewhat camouflaged as it nestles into a tiny hill against the Derwent River.

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The mosaics along the foreshore.

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The jumble of boats and boat houses at Prince of Wales Bay.

Hoon tyre marks

Road mark making in Lutana.

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Cornelian Bay’s oil tanks up close.

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The Tasman Bridge.

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The circus had come to town.

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The emptiness of an arena of stands waiting to be filled during wood chopping competitions.

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Reaching the ‘end of the line’ on arrival in Hobart city.

Kunanyi

Mount Wellington was a prominent feature in the lives of the Moomairremener people for thousands of years before white settlement of Van Diemens Land, later to be renamed Tasmania.  The indigenous names include Kunanyi, Unghbanyahletta and Poorawetter. I understand that the Palawa (which seems to be a collective term for all Tasmanian aborigines – perhaps a blog reader might be able to supply further information?) who are the surviving descendants of the original indigenous Tasmanians, tend to prefer the former name – Kunanyi.

A couple of years ago, the Tasmanian government introduced a dual naming approach to a number of geographical features around Tasmania, and these included the mountain which towers over the Greater Hobart Area and the Derwent River. The then Premier Lara Giddings remarked ‘Dual naming is about recognising the Aboriginal community’s rightful status as the first inhabitants of this land and celebrating their living culture, traditions and language’.

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Photo taken from Bellerive Bluff on Stage 4 of my walk along the Derwent River.

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Photo taken between Rose Bay and Lindisfarne on Stage 5 of my walk.

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Photo taken from Old Beach on Stage 7 of my walk.

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Photo taken from Green Point on Stage 8 of my walk.

I am including a posting specifically about ‘the mountain’ as locals refer to it, because it has been a significant marker on my trek from the mouth to the mouth of the Derwent River via the Bridgewater Bridge, and I am about to lose sight of it.  From Granton, as I walk west along the River and then northwards, the mountain will no longer be in view.

Current official information about walking tracks, facilities, weather related precautions and other details associated with the mountain can be read at http://www.wellingtonpark.org.au/  Note that you can download maps from this site.

The highlights of the 9th stage of my walk along the Derwent River

The 9th walk took place on 25th November. I loved every part of the day but a number of highlights stand out.

  • The tranquillity of Goulds Lagoon
  • Being at the Austins Ferry point and looking across to the Old Beach jetty
  • Finding James Austins House
  • Being surprised how long it took to walk around the water edge of Claremont Golf Course
  • Arriving at and walking around Dogshear Point
  • The down time at the Cadbury chocolate factory
  • Being followed by a duck
  • Pied Oyster Catchers on the golf course and parks
  • The rough-hewn bench seat near Lowestoft Bay
  • The memorial to defence force dogs
  • Discovering the Worm Mound at MONA

Earlier postings provide more information on these highlights or you can email me for further information

Please note; anyone choosing to walk this stage needs to be aware there are no public toilets. However, a number of businesses have toilet facilities to which you may be able to gain access.

My 10th walking stage will start at bus stop 33 in Berriedale and then will continue south towards Lutana.

The Claremont Bowls Club

From the Cadbury factory, the Bournville Road curved around towards the Claremont Bowls Club. The houses that I walked past were all interesting architecturally and represented diverse styles deemed suitable for past employees of the Cadburys confectionery manufacturer (which operated in Claremont from the early 1920s).  It seemed to me to be a row of history.

At the end of the road was a carpark for the Claremont Bowls Club through which the Derwent River beckoned me. I walked down the hill until I reached an impasse of fence and vegetation. I walked along this barrier and was able to recognise the eastern shore suburb of Old Beach.

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The Derwent River stretched northwards and I was surprised to realise I had walked so far south already that the Bridgewater Bridge was no longer in sight.

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Mt Direction was clearly visible.

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And just for the record, I didn’t stop for a bowl. There were more exciting discoveries to be made next door at the Claremont Golf Club.

Onto Austins Ferry edging the Derwent River on the 9th walking stage

At 9.36am last Tuesday I had passed St Virgil’s College with its warbling magpies and raucous plovers flying overhead and turned left at Merley Road. I was in the heartland of the suburb of Austins Ferry and now walking down a hill towards the River. Opposite a street signposted Willow Walk, I crossed some land and then up and over the railway line. I walked across an open area with large fat rabbits quickly disappearing from view.

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The view from the water’s edge looking northwards was as follows:

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Once at the River’s edge I turned left towards the Austins Ferry Yacht Club and a jetty.

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An interpretative panel explained that the Austin’s Ferry was the main Hobart to Launceston link from 1816 until 1848 when the bridge was constructed up stream. James Austin managed the Roseneath Ferry from the western shore and his friend James Earl managed the Compton Ferry from the eastern shore. I peered across the brightly lit water but could barely distinguish the Old Beach jetty on the other side. Clouds were scudding across bringing light and shade so that all my photographs which try to record the jetty on the other side are abysmal failures. Nevertheless I know where to look for that jetty from this Austin’s Ferry jetty.

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Roseneath on the Derwent River

Signs at the jetty at Old Beach on the Derwent River’s eastern shore referred to Roseneath opposite on the western Shore (within the northern suburbs of the City of Glenorchy). The very impressive blog postings by Geoff Ritchie at http://ontheconvicttrail.blogspot.com.au/2014/04/roseneath-house.html provides detailed and well researched information, plus great photographs.  I wonder if I will be in the vicinity of the location of Roseneath house when I walk this way next week (Harbinger Lane and Austin’s Ferry Road).