How far was the walk?

Walking from the Derwent River’s mouth on the eastern shore to Bridgewater Bridge then back to the mouth of the western shore was straightforward because almost all the walk happened on formal public tracks, paths or roads. This was also the case for the walk between Granton and New Norfolk.

However, from New Norfolk inland towards the Derwent River’s source at the southern end of St Clair Lagoon, most of the walk required access to public property and tracks seldom existed.  The walk from Gretna to St Clair Lagoon was not completed sequentially – that is, until Gretna each new stage started where the previous walking stage finished but this could not be the practice as I progressed inland.  From Gretna, the River was walked in sections according to the timing of permissions granted to walk on private land, my ability to reach a section using a supporter to drive me there and/or collect me at the end of a stage (the bus route runs many kilometres from the river and is scheduled infrequently), and the suitability of the weather to be walking in the remoter parts of Tasmanian wilderness. For practical purposes some walks started inland and came back towards Hobart.

In the table below

  • I have listed two options as SOURCE. I did this deliberately so that those who believe the River begins its journey at either St Clair Lagoon, the Derwent Basin or Lake St Clair can feel happy that I reached the goal. Personally I believe the River empties from St Clair Lagoon and so the St Clair Lagoon Dam is the starting line for the run of the Derwent River.
  • I have ordered the distances sequentially from Stage 15 to the Source of the River so the sections are clear.
  • I have written in ‘various walks’ to indicate coverage of an area was undertaken in more than one walk, so readers do not assume each entry reflects a single walking stage (as the column header implies).

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