Tag Archives: bush

Natural bush remnants amidst agricultural lands – posting 5 of 5

I hope you enjoy the subtle colours in the reflections on the Derwent River in this  video.  Did you hear the kookaburra?

I hope you enjoy the sounds (make sure your volume is turned up) and the sense of peace as the Derwent River rushed past me in the next two videos:  here with the sound of a crow, and here.

I always enjoy pretty sights of decay, although my photo doesn’t bring out the intense orange colour of the fungi that I remember.

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Natural bush remnants amidst agricultural lands –posting 1 of 5

The bush, whether  or not it has been disturbed by farmers, hydro workers, road makers or forestry men, is always alluring and endlessly attractive. It may be open, tangled or dense. Agriculturalists may have cleared land leaving occasional remnants of bush and tufts of its natural grasses. It will contain natives and exotics. The bush may be dry or wet. The colour may be grey-green naturally or from a dusty overlay.  Alternatively, myriads of other shades of green, grey, beige, and brown will fleck against rocky outcrops and the black or green glassiness of the Derwent River passing through.

The following photos and those in the subsequent postings in this series, were taken at various locations between Meadowbank Dam and its Power Station towards Gretna.

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Tarraleah Canal No 1 walk – signs to side roads along the way

Around the Mossy Marsh Creek area and elsewhere, many short roads intersected with the Hydro road. These are pathways to assist Hydro Tas with monitoring and managing various aspects of the water flow.  They allowed me to continue to follow the Canal and be near the original river bed. Enjoy the glorious bush in the photos below.

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Blog readers will have seen signs before, however the lovely things about these photos include the colours of the adjacent bush, the depth of soft looking leaf mulch beneath the tall trees and the sense of a rich wilderness all around.  The environment was truly splendid. Having a road to walk on was such a boon – manoeuvring through that bush would have been a major trial and perhaps not nearly as pleasant.

How to draw a forest

Many posts ago, I referred readers to the excellent online magazine Tasmanian Geographic.

The most recent issue contains an article which surprised me – a new topic for me, offering a new way of visualising the bush.  Paula Peeters has considered ‘How to Draw a Forest’. Her article made me realise that because of our perspective as we walk we never see ‘a forest’ at close range and we only ever see parts of the trees.  Of course this was obvious once it was pointed out. Now I am re-evaluating the way I look and think about our Tasmanian bush.