Tag Archives: seagulls

The scenic walk and something for people living with a disability

My walking pathway along the scenic edge of the Derwent River on Stage 14, passed between the New Norfolk Caravan Park and the glistening river water, so I continued unhindered to amble amidst the glow of autumn gold leaves.

By 2.40pm a new jetty presented on my right, public toilets and a Bowling Club were on my left and, in the air, wild geese honked. I could hear quacking ducks on the river.  I watched squalling seagulls fighting over nothing or so it seemed. A No Through Road sign was set only to control vehicular traffic and it was clear pedestrians were welcome to continue onwards.

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As I approached a large flat platform, at 2.45pm, I couldn’t work out what its reason for existence was.  What I saw was:

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When I read the sign its intended use was clear.

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This is the first time I have seen equipment or structures set out in a community/public space for a person who has a disability so s/he can continue their sport.  I was very impressed.

By 2.50 pm I had looked up onto the top of the hill to my left to see the still functioning 1825 heritage Bush Inn (the Inn was built in 1815). Apparently this is the oldest continuously licensed pub in Australia. You can read more information at http://www.australianbeers.com/pubs/bushin/bush.htm

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Before my walk along the Derwent River last Tuesday

As my bus from home into Hobart city passed over the Tasman Bridge before 7am, I looked down onto a dozen or so rowing boats slipping along the Derwent River. The wedges that their passing craft made were the only patterns on the still surface of the River.

The morning was suffused with golden light forewarning the rise of the sun over the hills.  The few wisps of cloud in an otherwise blue sky were coloured silvery pink.  The temperature was a brisk 8 degrees, but I felt clean and alive prompted by such a vital looking day.

Once in the city, I walked to Franklin Square ready to wait for the next bus to Blackmans Bay, my starting point for Stage 13. While waiting, I walked through the park and admired the grand symmetrical fountain splashes around a large bronze sculpture of the eminent 19th century Rear Admiral Sir John Franklin.  Overhead, I watched a squawk of Sulphur-Crested Cockatoos, with their wings lit by the first rays of sunshine, flying as a family.  Street cleaners were clearing rubbish bins and pathway surfaces.  Very few other people were out and about in the centre of the city (people were being active in the suburbs before commuting to work in the city a while later).

The large public chess set had been set out and was ready for play.

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As the sun struck the Treasury buildings at one end of Franklin Square park, clusters of fat seagulls (Silver Gulls) were nipping at early rising insects across the grass lawns.

Metro bus number 84 departed at 7.17am. By 7.33am we had climbed up and travelled along the Southern Outlet and were passing through Kingston. This gave me a clear cut side view of majestic Mount Wellington.  Every rock was hard edge and clear. The air was so clean.

At 7.41am I stepped off the bus at Wells Parade in Blackmans Bay, the location where I had finished Stage 12 of my walk.  The final walk to the mouth of the Derwent River was about to begin.