Tag Archives: Stage 14

The scenic walk and something for people living with a disability

My walking pathway along the scenic edge of the Derwent River on Stage 14, passed between the New Norfolk Caravan Park and the glistening river water, so I continued unhindered to amble amidst the glow of autumn gold leaves.

By 2.40pm a new jetty presented on my right, public toilets and a Bowling Club were on my left and, in the air, wild geese honked. I could hear quacking ducks on the river.  I watched squalling seagulls fighting over nothing or so it seemed. A No Through Road sign was set only to control vehicular traffic and it was clear pedestrians were welcome to continue onwards.

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As I approached a large flat platform, at 2.45pm, I couldn’t work out what its reason for existence was.  What I saw was:

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When I read the sign its intended use was clear.

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This is the first time I have seen equipment or structures set out in a community/public space for a person who has a disability so s/he can continue their sport.  I was very impressed.

By 2.50 pm I had looked up onto the top of the hill to my left to see the still functioning 1825 heritage Bush Inn (the Inn was built in 1815). Apparently this is the oldest continuously licensed pub in Australia. You can read more information at http://www.australianbeers.com/pubs/bushin/bush.htm

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Arrival at the ramp for launching boats into the Derwent River on Stage 14

I reached this beautiful location at 12.50pm, took in the surroundings and watched other visitors casually meandering around the area.

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A sign provided boat safety information.  On the second photo, an arrow points to the location of the boat ramp.

20150413_125729 Arrow to boat ramp

I felt I could stay here forever. I was warm in the sun, the sky was so blue and clear, no wind forced its way around the curves of the river and into this environment, the water was so clear I could watch a school of eating-size fish swimming around, and the perfect reflections on the river all contributed to my great sense of well being. For this alone, the Stage 14 of my walk along the Derwent River had been worthwhile.

Between the bridges: Stage 14 of my walk along the Derwent River

The achievement yesterday was to walk from the Bridgewater Bridge to the New Norfolk bridge on the western shore of the Derwent River.

I set off from home before the sun was up and I found Hobart was quiet when I arrived at the city bus mall.

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Then I bussed to Granton and alighted from the bus at the intersection with the Bridgewater Bridge causeway.

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From Granton I walked north-west then west towards the inland town of New Norfolk walking mostly along the Lyell Highway and then on a walking track for the last 5 or so kilometres. The morning was freezing and the afternoon warm.  But the sun was out; its hard autumn light made the world seem alive and sparkling. The Derwent River was splendid, often still and reflecting the trees and hills on its surface, under a bright blue sky with the sun shining gloriously.

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I finished my walk at the bridge crossing the Derwent River in New Norfolk.

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During the walk, I covered about 15½km of the length of the Derwent River.  By my reckoning, the total distance of the Derwent River on the western shore from the mouth of the River to New Norfolk is 54¼ km.

My walking distance was approximately 20¼kms.  I have now walked approximately 191¼ kms not counting getting to and from buses, as part of this project to walk along the Derwent River.

The highlights of the walk to New Norfolk were finding the remnants of two clearly visible heritage lime kilns, seeing a family of 6 pelicans, finding the track along the river leading to New Norfolk, and being mesmerised by the spectacular autumn foliage along the walk and especially in New Norfolk.

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I started walking from Granton around 8am and, despite wearing a thick woollen beanie plus a thermal top under my windproof jacket, I was frozen for the first two and a half hours.  It was 8 degrees Celsius at Bellerive when I left home, 6 degrees at Glenorchy and I suspect much less with a wind chill factor along the first part of the walk.  On this basis, I will not be walking further inland until sometime in Spring, and the timing of starting again towards Lake St Clair will depend on the air temperature.

Over the coming week I plan to enjoy writing up the journey and the discoveries of Stage 14’s walk in a series of different postings.