Tag Archives: Windermere Beach

Trekking around Windermere Bay

After leaving the Cadbury’s factory I wandered down the hill with brolly up mostly choosing the pathways left of Cadbury Road that were closest to the River. Occasionally there were single file tracks that descended to the River but I preferred to continue in the direction of the open and exposed Windermere Park. As I descended onto the flatter lowlands I had my first resight, since walking on the eastern shore, of the Bowen Bridge further south. In the distance I could see the tops of buildings that are part of the Nystar industry on the western shore opposite Risdon. Soon after arrival on the low parkland around 1.45pm, I walked past a fenced area designated as Windermere’s Passive Stormwater Treatment Wetland – this was attractively landscaped and so I thought it was a shame the fence was so ordinary by comparison. Black swans paraded across the blown waters of Windermere Bay. A new war memorial was in the process of construction.

Further across the lowlands, duckboard paths meandered over the water logged mud and water grasses. Finally I reached the impassable Faulkners Rivulet, a tiny stream with water from the mountains. Clearly others had rock hopped across the Rivulet but the rocks were slippery with green mosses and I was not prepared to slip, get wet and maybe sprain a body part. Instead, I walked up to the Main Road and was able to cross a 19th century simple but handsome sandstone bridge.

Sandstone Bridge Windermere Bay

I looked back across Windermere Bay to the white edifice of Cadbury on the slight rise in the distance.

20141125_140421

Not far along the Main Road from the bridge, I turned left at Windermere Beach Road at 2.07pm. Walking down this suburban street I was constantly amused by the free roaming ducks that were making a temporary home in various front yards, or simply taking a walk along the street. (I remember a house in which I lived in Darwin had ducks on the property, and their disturbing inclination to do their green business on the front door step. I wondered if these ducks had similar bad habits.) I smiled when one street was signposted Teal Street. Ducks were everywhere.

Something new. At the T junction of this road with Curlew Parade, the green shapes on the street corners between slabs of concrete pathway, out of which grew trees, was noticeably even and weed free. Artificial grass turf. I wondered if the City of Glenorchy Council had installed it or whether a frustrated local resident had paid for it. Looking around, straggling weeds and grasses was the norm for the public areas along these streets. I found the fake lawn to be highly attractive.

By 2.15pm I reached the Knights Point Reserve with sombre heavy clouds indicating major rain was on its way. The drops on my umbrella were the start of something stronger to come.

The track continued along behind Windermere Beach before trailing around a headland southwards.

Windermere Beach

9th Stage of walk along Derwent River completed yesterday, Tuesday 25 November

I caught two buses from my home in Bellerive on the eastern shore, via the Elizabeth St CBD Hobart and the Glenorchy City bus malls, to reach Granton on the western shore of the Derwent River in the northern suburbs of the City of Glenorchy in the Greater Hobart Area.

At 8.26am I stepped off the Metro number X1 bus at stop 47 outside the York Hotel in Granton South and, with excitement about what the day might bring, I looked around and admired the view across the River to the suburb of Bridgewater before starting the tramp south.

20141125_082854

No footpaths or walk ways had been laid for pedestrians and so vigilance was required against the traffic on the Main Road. Occasionally a few metres of concrete or bitumen were laid for a new subdivision but generally a track for smooth safe walking was not on offer.

The weather started sunny but during the afternoon rain passed intermittently. In the photo below you can see the grey background blurred by rain, but meanwhile three pelicans were enjoying themselves on Lowestoft Bay.

20141125_150144

Relentless buffeting wind was the main feature all day. As a result, I couldn’t keep my sun hat attached to my head. Needless to say, I returned home with a blasted red face.  But happy from the pleasure of walking, discovery and the fresh air. Being a tourist in my home town is a revelation and a joy.

I walked southwards from Granton South to MONA (the world famous Museum of New and Old Art) at Berriedale and passed through the suburbs of Granton South, Austins Ferry, Claremont and half of Berriedale.

I experienced Goulds Lagoon, Austins Ferry Bay, Rusts Bay, Beedhams Bay, Bilton Bay, Dogshear Point, Windermere Bay, Knights Point, Windermere Beach, Connewarre Bay, McCarthy’s Point, Lowestoft Bay, and Cameron Bay. I plodded around bays and a golf course (I gained special permission to walk this private property but I would NOT recommend anyone else try it – see later postings), had a stopover at Cadbury’s, and hid from the rain in gazebos and art works. All up, I probably walked 18 kms.

Yesterday I covered 9 ¼ km of the River’s length on the western shore. This adds to my previous tally of 3/4km on the western shore making a total of 10kms covered as I trek southwards from the Bridgewater Bridge to the mouth of the Derwent on the western shore.

Specific details of the different legs of this 9th stage walk will be written up and posted in the coming days.

My favourite photo of the day was taken near the end of my walk, when I sat at the point where the southern end of Cameron Bay met the Derwent River (with MONA just over the hill). The water had been frothed by wind and I liked the lacy remnants floating by.  The intense colours are the result of the rich light quality caused by the heavy clouds overhead.

20141125_153054