Tag Archives: Linden

Tea from Linden flowers

When I walked from New Norfolk to Bushy Park, I passed a property named Linden.  You can reread my post and the informative additional comments provided by blog followers.

Not long afterwards, a local friend exclaimed with surprise when I informed her that I did not know what a Linden tree looked like, and that I had never drunk tea brewed from Linden tree flowers.  Imagine my pleasure when, one day, Alex called by with a bag of dried linden flowers.  They seemed to possess an ethereal beauty. Out came my camera and here are the resulting photos.

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The tea was delicate but refreshing. Most enjoyable. Thanks Alex.

Culinary beauty

Recently, when I read Livia Day’s A Trifle Dead, I discovered a sub-genre of novels previously unknown to me: culinary crime. Across our planet, a move from selfies to photographing what you eat is trending.  And so many of us think about food all the time and love to see colour on our plates. As a result, I am inspired to take a break from the chronological postings about my last walk and introduce a food which barely has a connection with my walk.

An earlier blog post showed me passing the property Linden.  Over the Derwent River from Linden is the area known as Hayes, made memorable because until 2012 it housed a minimum security farm prison. I was surprised when I strolled through the Bathurst Street Farmers Market recently. A table full of beautiful red cabbage heads lay before me.  When I chatted to the growers, I learned these cabbages were grown on their property which borders the Derwent at Hayes.

Back home, I chopped a salad and prepared to cook a small salmon steak.  Organically grown, delicious, clean and fresh.

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Linden

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The name Linden is used to name streets, roads and courts in the Derwent Valley and elsewhere across Tasmania perhaps as a marker of someone with that surname who made an impact on the community in the past. But I could not find a Linden family history, or any other historical reason to justify the naming of the property I passed at approximately 5 kilometres west of New Norfolk.

Perhaps the naming was related to Linden trees native to England from where an early property owner may have travelled.  I cannot recognise this tree so I cannot say whether the trees on the property were lindens.

Alternatively, does Elena Gover’s account in Tasmania through Russian eyes (Nineteenth and early twentieth centuries) create another possibility? Was this property named after crew member Lieutenant Vilgelm Andreevich Linden of the Russian corvette Boyerin which arrived in Hobart in 1870 at a time of goodwill in terms of Australia-Russia relations? Linden wrote notes and collected extensive information about many aspects of Tasmania. ‘As well as chapters on geography, he made an analysis of the aftermath of transportation on the economic development of the island. Linden collected interesting information about the government and electoral system of Tasmania, and of the system of land allocation which allowed an influx of free settlers…

I did not walk down the driveway so I did not see existing residences at Linden. Apparently ‘Bryn Estyn’ homestead was built on the property in the 1840s, and named after the family home of new settler Lieutenant Henry Lloyd who had relocated from Wales. The State Library of Tasmania holds a photograph of the building:

Bryn Estyn

You may recall an earlier posting showed the Water Treatment Plant named ‘Bryn Estyn’. I can only assume the original land grants for Lloyd included the acres for the Treatment Plant.

A sandstone quarry on the property was the centre of attention when the building of Tasmania’s High Court in Hobart was being planned. Back in 1982, when A. A. Ashbolt owned the mineral lease, the quarry on the Linden property was surveyed to determine whether sufficient stone of ‘acceptable quality’ existed that would be suitable for cladding the new Court. Previously this stone was used on the Supreme Court of Tasmania. The stone was found to have been laid down in the Triassic period (about 3 million years ago), a time when the early dinosaurs were roaming the earth.

I suspect the property, marked with Linden at the entrance, is now known as Ashbolt Farm. The farm specialises in producing products from elderflower and olive trees and additional information is located here.  I wish I had known about this property prior to walking because I would have made arrangements to visit and enjoy a cup of hot elderberry tea.  When I passed this property last Thursday, there was no sign of life and no welcome sign posted.

Immediately past and in the vicinity of the property ‘Linden’, the racing Derwent River was visible from the road.

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