Tag Archives: Sandy Bay

Selection of landmarks along Sandy Bay Road

Once on Sandy Bay Road I turned left and continued walking southwards.When past the University of Tasmania grounds, over the road on my right was a Catholic co-educational secondary school operating in the Josephite tradition. This Mt Carmel College site includes an attractive 19th century sandstone building.

In a small park, a family of Sulphur Crested Cockatoos feasted on insects in the grass along with ducks and Silver Gulls.

20150119_083933

The day was very peaceful.

20150119_083937

At 8.40am I reached the entrance to Wrest Point Hotel (http://www.wrestpoint.com.au) which, in the 1970s, established the first legal casino in Australia.

20150119_084114

Apart from its poker machines and gambling rooms, this Hotel offers many bars and different restaurants. In addition, it runs a continuous program of concerts, guest artists and other entertainment events so that thousands of people pass through its doors weekly. With exploratory meandering I think it may be possible to walk through different parts of this Hotel and find a route close to the water’s edge. I didn’t feel confident that I would find my way around without finding myself in ‘no go’ areas. Instead I continued walking along Sandy Bay Road.

The business Network Gaming lives in what used to be a well-known and much loved pub, Travellers Rest:  one which I knew well in my student days.

20150119_084249

The Wrest Point Hotel land wraps around the old Travellers Rest hotel so, it wasn’t until I continued to walk along Sandy Bay Road that I discovered an original entrance to the Wrest Point property area.

20150119_084657

I reached the Derwent Water Beach Reserve at 8.50am.

20150119_085149

From there I could see two private jetties jutting out into the water.

20150119_084905

When I walked closer, it was clear that dozens of dinghies hung under protection waiting for their owners to come and row them out to yachts moored on the Derwent River.  In fact, as I watched, one fellow set off rowing.

20150119_085231

The time of day and the quality of the sunlight made this vista exceptionally beautiful; seagulls perched on the jetties, the water sparkled, a mild breeze dappled the surface of the River, happy dogs walked along attached to owners, and I was able to blot out the sound of noisy traffic streaming past behind and beside me. The water was crystal clear.

20150119_085408 20150119_085637

By 9.05am I was reading the information panel at the Maning Ave Reserve. This Reserve seemed to mark the change from the suburb of Sandy Bay to the suburb of Lower Sandy Bay. I learnt Fred Maning arrived in 1824 and his family farmed in the area (however I understand he spent most of his life in New Zealand, and it is not clear why he is remembered with his name on this park and on streets etc in the Lower Sandy Bay area).  Information boards such as these help me to understand how Hobart developed.

Sandy Bay along the foreshore

On Stage 11 of my walk along the Derwent River, having enjoyed Hobart’s wharf area and the edges of Salamanca and Battery Point, I continued walking along Short Beach at the beginning of Sandy Bay, past public toilets at 8.20am, towards the Sandy Bay Rowing Club and then along Marrieville Esplanade.

20150119_081832 20150119_081815

At 8.28am I reached the Royal Yacht Club of Tasmania and remembered my first Hobart job many years ago.  The photo below shows the entrance to this complex.

20150119_082553

A friend waitressed in the Club restaurant and I went to see if I could get a similar job. I had no experience in hospitality but, full of unsubstantiated confidence, I approached the head chef. He told me that without experience he could not give me a job. I stood my ground and said that until I had worked in a job I wouldn’t have experience and therefore the only way I could get experience would be if he hired me.  And he did.  As a washer of dishes and all the kitchen wares.  Eventually I was allowed to place the lettuce on plates, then make the salads, then cook the potato chips and fried rice in large pots, and finally I reached the heights of being permitted to cook steaks for customers.  After many months the head chef recalled his first meeting with me and how (I forget the word he used but its meaning was clearly something like) pushy, stubborn, strong willed and unable to take no for an answer I was, and it was my approach which inclined him to give me a go. It certainly helped to pay the rent and I was very grateful.  I remain grateful because I learnt a lot about human nature in that hot kitchen where pressure turned people into animals.

But back to my Stage 11 walk.

A couple of minutes later I was walking past the Derwent Sailing Squadron buildings and could see yachts everywhere in and out of the water.  Past the Squadron buildings, in the distance, the tall building indicated Wrest Point Hotel was not far away and I knew I would walk past it a little later.

20150119_082956

In the distance, slightly inland on my right, the many buildings of the University of Tasmania cascaded down the hill; part of the slope of Mount Nelson.

20150119_083125

A car drove past and the driver waved and smiled at me. Once friend Ma was out of her car, she explained that with her husband she was about to put their yacht into the water (after its recent debarnacling – if there is such a word) and enjoy a sail along the Derwent.  “Would I like to stay and watch?’ she asked. I wanted to stay focused on my walk in case weather might not be suitable on other days, and declined with some inner hesitation.  What a great offer.  Maybe another time I can say yes.  Perhaps a sail??? Who knows.

The opportunity to continue walking close to the foreshore came to an abrupt stop and it was clear private houses owned the area at the back of their houses to water level. So I took a path to Sandy Bay Road, arriving at 8.35am.

Battery Point on Stage 11 of my walk along the Derwent River

Many websites provide information about the very old suburb of Battery Point; for example, read http://www.batterypoint.net/; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battery_Point,_Tasmania; or http://www.hobartcity.com.au/community/arts_and_culture/public_art/battery_point

I walked as close to the Derwent River as I could and therefore did not wind around the cute streets with their changing architecture, and I was not on the hunt for historical landmarks within the suburb. A morning’s meander through the streets can be very instructive but a walk close to the foreshore also has its attractions. Besides, every street in Battery Point is interesting.

Having left Salamanca and the Castray Esplanade, I walked to the River and along a pathway. When I reached the A J White Park I looked around and absorbed some of the contemporary sculptural forms which were sited there.

20150119_075652 20150119_075552 20150119_075450

At 7.55am I turned up and away from the water because continuing access around the few rocks jutting out of the water was not possible. At 7.58am I turned left at Clarke Ave and at 8.03am I turned left at Marine Terrace.

A few minutes later, as I approached Derwent Lane which led to a dead-end down at the water (with previous knowledge I decided it was not worth the effort of walking down and then straight back up) a woman stopped and questioned me. ‘What are you writing?’ she wanted to know. Her body frame relaxed when I explained my project. I didn’t need to be told that the issue of public access to the foreshore is a very sore and contested point in this suburb as homeowners are feeling increased pressure to agree to a boardwalk being built in front of their very expensive and private homes  – residents believe they purchased sole and permanent access to the high tide mark. Undoubtedly the woman was wondering whether I had been commissioned to do another survey or some other work without community consultation.

If you are following in my footsteps, then the path southwards continues by walking along Napoleon Street. Either side of the road I enjoyed the spectacle of exceptional houses of many vintages and styles.

20150119_080926 20150119_080931 20150119_081054

Eventually I stepped down an extremely steep part of Napoleon Street and could see Mount Wellington to my right and Mount Nelson to my left with great clarity.

20150119_081413 20150119_081326

At the bottom of the street I crossed the Sandy Bay Rivulet and arrived at the Errol Flynn Reserve.

20150119_081611 20150119_081658

The Rivulet runs out into Short Beach which edges the Derwent River at this point.

20150119_081621

I had left the suburb of Battery Point and arrived in the suburb of Sandy Bay and it was only 8.15am.