Tag Archives: Cluny Lagoon

Lake Repulse Dam and the wooden bridge

I knew I was near the end of the walk when I sighted the concrete top of Lake Repulse Dam.

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I continued walking until the single-lane bridge over the Derwent River came into view.

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I expected little traffic in this area so I walked onto the bridge for a good look down towards Cluny Lagoon and then upstream towards the Dam wall and the water being disgorged at its base.

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Future postings will contain the detail and show photos of my walk through the bush along the top right of the dam wall as I headed inland around Lake Repulse Dam towards Catagunya Dam.

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When I was standing close to the dam wall, I was able to look back to the wooden bridge.

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I felt privileged to see this wooden bridge which must be one of the few left around Tasmania.  I imagine that in not too many years’ time, a ‘modern’ metal one will replace it. Meanwhile this sturdy piece of engineering is a very attractive find located not so far from the Lyell Highway.

Closing in on the Lake Repulse Dam

As I closed in on the western end of Cluny Lagoon and the Lake Repulse Dam, I was able to walk lower down nearer the water.  Sometimes a strip of vegetation made accessing water a challenge, whereas in other places, anglers had made their own access paths.

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For the last few hundred metres to Lake Repulse Dam, it was easier to walk on the gravelled surface of Lake Repulse Dam Road than to push my way through the bush on the steep uneven river bank.

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Panoramic views

I continued walking up and down the cleared land of the undulating landscape forever keeping as close to the Cluny Lagoon as practicable.

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And occasionally I deviated away from the river to capture the panorama.

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In addition, I felt compelled to take photos of the towers and wires which remind me that the water of the Derwent River is being used to generate electricity.  Cluny Lagoon exists to keep us electrified.

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Feather

I took a couple of photos of a feather as I walked beside Cluny Lagoon. However, because of the large length and with my eyes squinting against the pervasive sunlight, I missed seeing that the entire feather was not within the photo frame.

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This was a very very large feather.  You can see the front of my walking boot next to the feather. I placed my heel at the quill end of the feather so you can get an idea of the length of the feather.

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So – which type of bird lost a feather?  My first reaction is that the feather will be from an endangered Tasmanian Wedged Tail Eagle.  Is there a blog follower who can identify this feather?

The colours of Cluny Lagoon

Apart from a boat trailing a skier motoring up and down the Lagoon, the water was ruffled only by occasional breezes.  Despite the occasional rain the afternoon was comfortably warm, and so the Lagoon looked inviting.  But I walked on.

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20160124_143302Depending on the light, the Lagoon sometimes glistened blue or sat as a plane of gun metal grey.

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At other times, the water seemed almost to be a shade of green for a tonal blend with the landscape.

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Cow tracks

A mesh of cow tracks can be followed along the edge of the Cluny Lagoon. Some indicate that locals walk these tracks from time to time but most were faint and optional.

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Where the cliffs or banks fell straight into the water, the only choice was to walk on their tops.

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