Tag Archives: Tiger snake

Sheets of silk and other flood coping mechanisms

 

With the rains earlier this year came an intriguing phenomenon not seen often.  Stunningly beautiful nets spread across bushes and trees- what were these and where did they come from?  Refer article 1 .  Refer article 2

Incidentally, the tiger snake shown in the Mercury newspaper article produces a highly toxic venom and I am surprised to see it being handled in a seemingly casual manner.  Parks and Wildlife Service Tasmania provide further information: “The highly toxic venom is produced in large amounts. The venom is mainly neurotoxic, affecting the central nervous system, but also causes muscle damage and affects blood clotting. The breakdown of muscle tissue can lead to kidney failure.” I never saw a tiger snake during my walks but they would have been around me on many occasions.  Thankfully they are shy and will not attack unless cornered or threatened in some way. I was always wary of accidentally standing on one if it crossed my path.

The White Lip or Whip Snake – more information

A couple of days ago a photo news story about a Tasmanian whitelip snake was published.

Immediately I recognised the snake in the photo as looking the same as the two I have seen on my walks and which I have discussed in a couple of recent posts. Now I don’t care if guidelines indicate my snakes were longer than the normal range and nor do I care that some people swear what I saw could not be a White Lip – I feel convinced about the identity as a White Lip. Next time I come across one in the wilds I will look for the white lip – but I am not hoping to see another.  This and the other two Tasmanian snakes are all venomous.

On the theme of snakes, while making a quick trip inland to walk a small ‘gap’along the Derwent during this past week, I saw hanging dead over a rural gate the largest fattest going on for two metres long black (which I assume was a Tiger) snake that I have ever seen.  Someone obviously thought this would amuse passers-by.  I decided not to photograph and publish the snake because I thought the image might frighten my friends and relatives who always worry for me when I am in the bush. I have never seen such a large snake in the Tasmanian wilds (although I have been up close and almost too personal with deadly King Brown snakes in the Northern Territory in northern Australia).

Update – identifying snakes

Recently I published the post Snakes Alive.

Today I have been informed that the snakes I saw in recent walks would not be the White Lipped Snake or Whip Snake because the size of the snakes I saw is too large; rather those I saw are likely to be juvenile Tiger or Brown snakes.  I cannot find any information or photographs showing or describing an immature snake that matches what I have seen.  Are there any blog followers who know their Tasmanian snakes?  If so, I welcome feedback.