Max Angus’s Derwent exhibition

Researching Max Angus’s ‘source to sea’ exhibition is still a work in progress.  Meanwhile I have found other documents and websites which list watercolours depicting various aspects of the Derwent River.

Sue Backhouse & Christa Johannes  co-authored the publication Max Angus: a lifetime of watercolour and provided the following information:  the … watercolour landscapes … have been selected from a sixty-year period to enable a broad exploration of subject matter and stylistic changes. The work includes examples from each decade since the late 1940’s. The earliest watercolours were painted when Max Angus returned to Hobart following the Second World War.” 

A pdf document, SIXTY-FIVE PAINTINGS by ‘THE SUNDAY PAINTERS Max Angus, Harry Buckie, Roy Cox, Patricia Giles, Geoff Tyson, and Elspeth Vaughan from the collection of Don & Maggie Row can be read here. This document provides details of a few of Max’s earlier Derwent related works; for example Bay on the Derwent River (1957); a watercolour 24.5 × 37 cm (sight) signed lower right ‘Max Angus’ in original artist’s frame and hand-painted double mount; exhibited in November 1957 with Tasmanian Group of Painters for their 18th Annual Exhibition at the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery in Hobart. It was listed as no.1 in the catalogue and on sale for 12 guineas. Verso on the backing upper [handwritten large, in the artist’s hand] ‘A Bay on the Derwent River / Max Angus. Another watercolour, Tasman Bridge and Derwent River Hobart c.1970 was signed lower left ‘Max Angus’ . His pen and grey wash Hobart from Lewis Street, 1980 offered a view of Hobart and the Derwent and Eastern shore hills from the garden at 6 Lewis Street, North Hobart.

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